Dangerous goods packaging ratings - Episode 1

Dangerous goods packaging ratings - Episode 1

December 2015

  • Overview
  • What does a dangerous goods rating label look like?
  • What does the sequence of numbers and letters mean?
 

Overview of dangerous goods packaging ratings

=> Packaging approved for transporting hazardous materials must be marked.
=> The marking must be legible and durable.
=> Generally speaking, two types of products can be transported in approved packaging*

  • Solids
  • Liquids (including viscous liquids)

** We are referring to the types of packaging distributed by Fidel Fillaud

=> There are different regulations depending on the shipping method selected

  • ADR (road transport)
  • RID (rail)
  • ADN (inland waterways)
  • IMO-IMDG (maritime)
  • IATA-ICAO (air)
 

What does a dangerous goods rating label look like?

Depending on the material to be transported, there are several types of markings:

  • Marking for the transport of hazardous liquids
  • Marking for the transport of hazardous viscous liquids packaged in light gauge metal packaging (tinplate)
  • Marking for the transport of hazardous solids
  • Marking for the transport of hazardous liquids in IBCs

The marking appears directly on the packaging.

Take a look at the examples below.

TMD-marquage-fut-plastique TMD-marquage-fut-carton TMD-marquage-jerrican-plastique
TMD-fut-plastique TMD-fut-carton TMD-jerrican-plastique
TMD-marquage-seau-métal TMD-marquage-IBC
TMD-seau-metal TMD-IBC

 

 

• What do the numbers and letters mean?

How to read them

  •  Sample marking for the transport of hazardous liquids

TMD UN liquide
  • Sample marking for the transport of hazardous viscous liquids packaged in a light gauge metal packaging (tinplate)

RID ADR

1For viscous liquids whose viscosity at 23° C exceeds 200mm²/s the measurement used is not specific gravity (like liquids) but gross mass, in other words container + content (like solids)

2 In packaging for Hazardous Materials, the letter S stands for "packaging for the transport of solids." In the case of light gauge metal packaging marked RID/ADR (like the marking above), the S stands for "packaging intended to contain liquids whose viscosity at 23° C exceeds 200mm²/s"

  •  Sample marking for the transport of hazardous solids

TMD solid UN
  •  Sample marking for IBCs (Intermediate Bulk Container)

... and what they mean

 

Let's look at our example of a marking for the transport of hazardous liquids:

IBC

1A1 => Packaging identification code

This code provides information on the type, material and category of the packaging.

The first digit corresponds to the type of packaging

The letter corresponds to the material the packaging is made of

Generally, the second digit corresponds to the type of closure

1 - drums, pails

3 - jerricans-jugs

4 - boxes

6 - composite packagings (composed of an outer packaging and an inner container that are inseparable)

0 - light gauge metal packagings (for RID-ADR)

31 - IBCs for liquids

A - steel, tinplate

B - aluminium

G - fibreboard

H - plastic

For composite packaging, there are 2 letters: the second letter refers to the material used for the outer packaging

1 - closed head

2 - open head

For fibreboard packaging, the type of closure is not specified because it is always open head (lid + ring lock)

For IBCs:
1 = rigid plastic inner container

2 = flexible plastic inner container

The information in this table is for the types of packagings distributed by Fidel Fillaud

So 1A1 means a closed head steel drum

and 6HA1 would be a steel drum with a PE inner lining

Y => Packing Group

  • The letter X identifies packagings that meet the requirements of hazard levels I, II and III
  • The letter Y identifies packagings that meet the requirements of hazard levels II and III
  • The letter Z identifies packagings that meet the requirements of hazard levels III

Packing Group I = Great Danger (high hazard)
Packing Group II = Medium Danger (medium hazard)
Packing Group III = Minor Danger (low hazard)

F => Country code

Code of the State authorizing the mark

Comment

Well, all this is very informative but unfortunately not really helpful when it comes to determining the right packaging to transport your product! As always, theory is one thing, but putting it into practice is another.

In our next Digitalink you will find EPISODE 2 of our Dangerous Goods Transport series. We'll tell you more about how to choose the packaging you need.

 

Any reproduction of this Article is prohibited without the written consent of Fidel Fillaud or attribution